Ancient History, History, Medieval History

The Church of the Resurrection, part 3

The previous post made a passing reference to the building of the Dome of the Rock which still sits on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. The construction of this shrine and the remaking of the Temple Mount as a Muslim holy site is significant enough that we should consider it before continuing the story of… Continue reading The Church of the Resurrection, part 3

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Ancient History, Medieval History

The Church of the Resurrection, part 2

In my last post, I talked about the construction of the original basilica and rotunda built on the site of Jesus' burial and resurrection. Those buildings were built in 337 CE and stood unmolested until 614 CE. What happened next is probably one of the worst things you have never heard of. In 476 CE,… Continue reading The Church of the Resurrection, part 2

Book Reviews, History, Medieval History, Reading

A Fascinating Look into Medieval England

I love medieval history. I know that makes me weird. It's ok.Once, my father brought one of his friends up to New Hampshire to visit me. While sitting in a diner, my dad says, "Joe, ask him what he does with his free time." His friend looked at me. I told him, "I study medieval… Continue reading A Fascinating Look into Medieval England

History, Medieval History

Celebrating “National Sibling Day” a Little Late

Yesterday was apparently "National Siblings Day", and I missed it. To commemorate this rather insignificant day, I have chosen to write about a couple of my favorite siblings. It begins with an empress, the daughter of an English king. Her name was Matilda, and her father Henry Beauclerc (Henry I) was both King of England… Continue reading Celebrating “National Sibling Day” a Little Late

History, Medieval History

How Important Is a Single Person’s Faith?

In 1098, the armies of the First Crusade were besieging the city of Antioch. One of the commanders, Etienne Henri Comte de Blois (Count Stephen Henry of Blois as English historians style his name), abandoned the army and fled back to France. On his way, he encountered the armies of the Byzantine emperor Alexios Komnenos… Continue reading How Important Is a Single Person’s Faith?

Medieval History

Mesarites Fearing No Thieves

In 1204, French Crusaders broke down the seawalls of Constantinople and sacked the greatest city on earth. Although the French nobles and their Venetian allies had agreed to keep the sacking to a non-violent minimum (there was a ban on raping women and killing priests), the rank and file of the Crusader army was not… Continue reading Mesarites Fearing No Thieves

Doesn't Fit in a Category, General, Medieval History

Dandolo on the Prow

In 1203, a massive Venetian fleet sailed into the Golden Horn intent on landing a Crusader army and taking the city of Constantinople. The Crusaders had intended to sail to Egypt but they had failed to pay the Venetians and now were doing the Venetians bidding in attempting to put the young claimant Alexius Angelus… Continue reading Dandolo on the Prow